Categories
DIY Health

DIY Lavender Eczema Sugar Scrub

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ admin_label=”section”][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb”]

While anyone can use this lovely DIY sugar scrub to exfoliate, moisturize, and get silky soft skin; a sugar scrub can be the perfect asset to help itchy eczema (especially the flaky, crusty, ‘my skin is constantly peeling off’, body dandruff -dry type of eczema we all know and despise…).

When it comes to my fellow eczema sufferers, a sugar scrub can do more than just exfoliate and moisturize. The sweet relief of a gentle scratch the sugar scrub brings along is not often talked about in the eczema community.

We aren’t supposed to scratch after all.

However, sometimes on particularly bad days it feels like the only thing you can do to achieve a fleeting sense of relief (even though you know deep down you’ll be worse off because of it). 

When I was suffering with dyshidrotic eczema my hands would itch, crack, and bleed constantly. They begged for moisture, and it felt like nothing did kept them hydrated. After one particularly sleepless night, (irritated and sleep deprived) I grabbed a sugar scrub that was shoved to the farthest corner of my bathroom cupboard. I had made it long ago as a gift for a friend and (as this itchy sleepless night drug on) it was lucky that I had some left over. The sugar scrub provided a sweet relief that I desperately needed and from then on was used whenever I got a particularly nasty flare.  

Again, everyone and their dog knows to not scratch eczema… but it can be tough to resist. If you do use a sugar scrub to help with the itching please, please remember to rub the sugar scrub in circular motions and push very gently. You can easily damage your already irritated and sore hands by scratching too hard!

I learned that lesson the hard way…

In this sugar scrub, lavender and raw honey team up to provide even more relief with their soothing and anti-inflammatory properties. Thanks to those superhero ingredients you can trust that your sensitive skin is in good hands and will be left delightfully smooth, refreshed, and itch free (even if it’s just for a little while)!

Enough with the chit chat, let’s get started!

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/STV_7629.jpg” animation=”off” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”You Will Need:” admin_label=”Blurb”]

  • 1 water-tight jar or container
  • 1 cup of sugar
  • 1/2 cup of coconut oil or olive oil
  • 10 – 12 drops of lavender essential oil
  • 2 tsp of raw or manuka honey* (See below)
  • 2 drops of red food coloring (optional)
  • 2 drops of blue food coloring (optional)

 

* Using either raw or manuka honey will yield the best results for your skin (and health!) It’s been found that the honey industry is very poorly regulated, and as a result some generic or ‘table’ honey actually contain very little honey and are instead filled with corn syrup and artificial sweeteners. Even if a generic brand of honey contains only honey (really, is that so much to ask?) the processes table honey undergoes destroys most of the honey’s bio-active components (the very stuff we want!) and leaves us with essentially a liquid sugar.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”17.9688px|0px|0px|0px” admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Directions” admin_label=”Blurb”]

Start by melting your raw honey to make it easier to stir. Then, in your water tight container combine together all ingredients, stirring until everything is evenly mixed.

Screw the lid on tight and place either in the fridge or in a bathroom cabinet until you’re ready to use it. This mixture can last up to two months.

Note: It’s not essential to refrigerate your sugar scrub, but some people may feel more comfortable doing so. It’s entirely up to you!

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_image admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/STV_7657.jpg” animation=”off” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”To Use” admin_label=”Blurb”]

Dampen your hands or a bath sponge and place your desired amount of sugar scrub onto it.

Exfoliate (and get a nice scratch!) by rubbing gently in circular motions to remove dead skin cells. Use all over or just on particularly persistent eczema ridden itchy spots. Again, remember to rub gently!

When you’re done, rinse off with lukewarm or cool water and pat yourself dry with a towel. If desired, put on your favorite moisturizer to top it all off!

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/STV_7644.jpg” animation=”off” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb]

There we have it! A gentle, exfoliating, and moisturizing sugar scrub perfect for sensitive (and itchy) skin!

Health & Happiness,

Savannah

P.S  You guy’s I ‘ve been eczema free for 2 weeks now! Healthy fingers crossed it stays that way! Check out A Simple Elimination Diet and What To Expect On An Elimination Diet for a no b.s. guide on how you can take the steps to curing this itchy rash once and for all!

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”1_2″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/DIY-10.jpg” animation=”off”][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”1_2″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Love-it_-2.jpg” animation=”off”][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Categories
Health

What To Expect On An Elimination Diet

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ admin_label=”section”][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb”]

I don’t just talk the talk -I walk the walk too.

For the past month and a half I’ve been going through the motions of both keeping a food diary and being on an elimination diet. It was tough at times, and tears were shed, but I wouldn’t change a thing. Thanks to a little bit of perseverance (and a whole lot of daydreaming about ice cream!) I’ve discovered all of my food triggers and (as of now, fingers crossed) my skin is just as clear as it was before that first little patch of itchy red skin appeared over a year ago!

If  that’s not enough incentive to start an elimination diet then I’m not sure what is.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”17.9688px|0px|0px|0px” admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”The Elimination Diet | What to Expect” admin_label=”Blurb”]

There is a few things that nobody mentions when it comes to elimination diets. From the tears, flares, cravings, healing, (and even losing weight!) I’m here to highlight the highs and the lows of this diet that has changed my life for the better… despite the hardships!

 

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”0px|0px|0px|0px” admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Stage 1: The Refusal” admin_label=”Blurb”]

At first, the elimination diet can seem a bit daunting. At least 23 days without fast food, alcohol, dairy, eggs, and gluten (just to name a few!) can make anybody shake in their boots. 

What am I supposed to eat? Am I stuck drinking water and eating ice for a month? I’d rather die.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Stage 2: The Breaking Point” admin_label=”Blurb”]

I thought the same thing, but eventually, everyone finds their breaking point.

Where enough is finally enough, and you refuse to let eczema destroy your life any longer. After this breaking point, it’s easy to push past the fear of starting this (daunting) diet. For me, this breaking point was a day or two after My Terrible Mistake. With my skin (which took weeks to partially heal from the last flare) becoming absolutely destroyed in mere hours, enough was finally enough. I decided I was no longer going to live in fear, clueless about what would absolutely destroy my skin, cause itchy sleepless nights, and what wouldn’t.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/STV_6962.jpg” animation=”off” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Stage 3: The Beginning” admin_label=”Blurb”]

Where you take the plunge and vow that for at least 23 days you will keep a food diary and remove the top 8 eczema triggers (plus fast food and alcohol).

Good for you! This step alone deserves a huge pat on the back!

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Stage 4: The Discovery” admin_label=”Blurb”]

While daunting at first, this seemingly restrictive diet quickly becomes less of a menacing grizzly bear and more like a teddy bear right before your eyes. It is at this stage where you discover that there really is a whole lot of food you can still eat and enjoy!

Push a little further and you’ll see that there is not much food you’ll be lacking -even when it comes to desserts! In fact, I enjoyed many desserts such as ‘Dad’s Goodie Squares(which taste so good you think they must be bad for you!), ‘Choco-la-ti-da‘ (for fondue) and ‘Peanut Butta’ Cookies‘ with no fear of a nasty flare up. Some of these did include nuts (read the ‘Cheater’ section down below for an explanation!) however, there are still plenty of desserts you can enjoy without nuts such as ‘Nice Cream‘ or ‘Gluten and Dairy Free Cookies‘ -so don’t be afraid to experiment!

Besides my killer sweet tooth insisting I eat dessert, common staples for me included fruit, vegetables,salads, chicken, salmon, rice, and smoothies. I ate whenever I wanted, as much as I wanted and never felt like I was lacking. Not once did I ever count calories or portion servings. I listened to my body and ate real  food -mostly plants.

Side note: Words cannot even describe just how much fruit and veggies I ate. It was  A LOT  as they were perfect to grab when you’re feeling hungry right now, when you’re on the go, or when you needed a quick snack!

Of course, at this stage you are also still discovering any hidden sensitivities that don’t consist of the top eight triggers (thanks to your trusty food diary!). For many people this can be anything from nightshades to even herbal tea! So again, keep writing in your food diary.

Note: At this stage, some people’s symptoms actually get worse. Keep at it, and allow your body to get it out of it’s system and it will get better in no time. If there are strong links between what you ate and your flare, remove the suspected food culprit from your diet and  re-introduce it at the end of your  diet once again.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/STV_6977.jpg” animation=”off” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Stage 5: The Cravings” admin_label=”Blurb”]

Despite all the yummy and healthy foods you’re eating (and the fact you’re eating as much as you want!) sometimes cravings sneak up. If you’re anything like me, wanting sweets happens at least every other day!

To get through those 23 days (I actually did 30) and the tough cravings I had several tactics:

  1. I made sure to go through my diet one day at a time. “One day.” I would say, “I just have to get through today without eating ___________ (insert: pizza, ice cream, chocolate, bread -you name it) “. Then the next day I would tell myself it again, and again, and again. Focusing on one day rather than 23+ of no naughty (but delicious foods) kept me feeling motivated rather than distraught at how many days I had left.
  2. If my killer sweet tooth really started acting up, I would quiet it down with a serving (or two!) of a tummy safe desserts. Again, I ate what I wanted, as much as I wanted (as long as it was tummy safe of course).
  3. I carried tummy safe food with me at all times. If I got hungry, I wouldn’t be tempted to eat something bad simply because it was there.

Over time as your skin begins to improve, the desire for naughty foods disappears. Choosing between healthy, itch free skin and 20 minutes of naughty foods becomes a no brainer. Eventually I could watch people eat ice cream, cake, pizza, chocolate -you name it and not be fazed.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”17.9688px|0px|0px|0px” admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Stage 6: The Biggest Obstacle” admin_label=”Blurb”]

At some point within your 23 days, one of the biggest obstacles comes to surface: Eating at other people’s homes or perhaps worse, restaurants.

At this stage, eating food you didn’t prepare can feel like a game of Russian Roulette. You don’t know exactly what’s in this food and whether or not it will affect you. On top of it all, having to be the one people have to accommodate for can be awkward and embarrassing. Refusing food a host has made for you or sending food back to the kitchen can make you feel even worse.

Only once during my 30 days did I accidently eat food at a friends house that once again, ruined my hands and destroyed my courage. I wept for hours, and hours, and hours. To this day, I’m not sure what was in it that made me flare but I suspect it was some sort of dairy.

 Even now that I’m off the super restricitive diet -eating at friends homes or restaurants is an intimidating event. Check out this guide on How to Eat At Friends and Loved Ones Homes With Dietary Restrictions for some tips that saved me along the way!

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”0px|0px|17.9688px|0px” admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/coconut4.jpg” url=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/how-to-eat-at-friends-and-loved-ones-homes-with-dietary-restrictons/” animation=”off” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Stage 7: The Healing” admin_label=”Blurb”] Over the weeks, you’ll notice your skin getting better and better! There really is no better feeling than waking up from a peaceful, itch free sleep, with healthy and happy skin. [/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Stage 8: The Unexpected Fear” admin_label=”Blurb”]

As the end of the diet draws near, butterflies of  both delight and fear dance in your stomach.

This stage is Re-introduction, where you learn what foods you can tolerate, and what you must go without. This stage was the scariest, even more so than the Russian Roulette feeling of eating at restaurants.  When you’ve worked so hard getting your skin so clear and itch-free, it becomes very difficult to expose yourself to foods that might make you flare. Alas, to finish the diet and know once and for all the foods we can and can’t tolerate, it must be done. This can be a bit heart breaking, but in the end you’ll be better for it.

For me, fear danced in my stomach more than delight did. So much that I actually put off introducing certain foods like gluten and eggs for a lot longer than I needed to. When I finally did try gluten, I went straight to my favorite bagel that I’ve been missing. That was a BIG mistake, especially because when I finally was ready to try gluten I didn’t even bother reading the ingredients which included my food devil -dairy.

So I ate this bagel I’ve been dearly missing and the very next day bubbles surfaced under my skin. Once again, I cried for hours, and hours, and hours mourning gluten’s part in my life. When I told my mother what happened, she just shook her head and jokingly scolded my choice for re-introduction. She insisted that I try again, this time with a simple bread.

I was scared, but I did. For days I anxiously awaited another flare….but nothing happened. Anxious I tried once more, and nothing surfaced. To my delight, wheat and gluten could once again be added to my diet! That was a hard lesson that reminded me to pay attention to the ingredients.

Dairy was a whole other obstacle and the very last one to be introduced. No surprise, I was terrified. I didn’t want to. I’d seen the damage this devil caused in the past and I wasn’t ready to invite it back to wreak havoc on my body again. So I put it off for days, and days, and days. My mother suggested that if I was gonna go down, might as well eat something I really missed -like icecream.

A plan was born to get a Dairy Queen Cake with the words ‘Doomsday’ written on it and… I almost did it. Again, I got scared. I already knew I was lactose intolerant, and even if I didn’t react eczema wise (like I was 98% sure I would) I didn’t want to suffer the other bodily consequences of eating dairy when you’re lactose intolerant! If you don’t know what I mean… first of all lucky you and second of all… to paint a pretty picture it’s a lot of bloating and poop. Yay…

I didn’t wind up eating dairy, and I don’t regret it at all. My terrible mistake, my lactose intolerance, and my food diary all alluded to the fact that dairy was my culprit.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/STV_7181.jpg” animation=”off” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Stage 9: ThE End & Other Surprises” admin_label=”Blurb”]

A couple weeks have gone by and with my skin completely healed (again, fingers crossed it stays this way!) I am one happy girl! I bake and cook with coconut milk, use a coconut butter, and even found a coconut ice cream that is to die for! As for calcium, my sources include dark leafy greens, nuts, chia seeds, and salmon just to name a few. To my delight, a couple of unexpected surprises came out of this whole thing.

First and probably the most important, this habit I developed for eating healthy foods and mostly plants has stuck with me even after the diet. On very, very, very, rare occasions, I reach for something pre-packaged. For the most part though, my diet still consists of fruits, veggies, salmon, chicken, salads, rice, and smoothies… with the welcome addition of eggs, nuts, and wheat!

Second, while eating whatever I wanted -even when indulging in tummy safe desserts I had lost some weight! While I didn’t go on this diet for that purpose, it was a pretty great bonus!

I trust that with my new found habit in place, I’ll keep the pounds off  and keep my skin clear!

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Pumpkin.jpg” animation=”off” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Cheater, Cheater, Pumpkin Eater” admin_label=”Blurb”]

You get what you put into this diet. If you cut corners and cheat, this diet isn’t likely to pay off in the way that you hope. In the end, the only person you’re cheating and hurting is yourself.

That being said, I’ll be the first to admit that I cheated too.

I’m only human after all.

However, it’s important to note what I did cheat on. I never decided to have eggs, bread, or milk the one day and then swear off them for the next little while. That is inconsistency and provides inconsistent results. The exact opposite of what we’re trying to achieve here.

On the contrary, I cheated by including an entire group early on. Swearing that as soon as I noticed any flares linked to this food group, I would remove it entirely. The group I included three days after starting my elimination diet was peanuts and nuts. I had never noticed an adverse reaction to them before and I desperately needed some snack fuel that would keep me full for hours when I was busy working or out and about exploring (like going to Ing’s Mine -which was AMAZING!).

So yes, I cheated too. I guess what I’m trying to say is that if you’re going to cheat on this diet, pick an entire food group early on and stick with it. No caving into bread cravings one day and then swearing off of it the next few. But remember, you get what you put into this diet -the more you remove (and the less you cheat) the better!

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/james.jpg” animation=”off” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”What if this doesn’t work for me?” admin_label=”Blurb”]

If this diet didn’t work for you, you need to take a reflect inwards and be 100% honest with yourself. As above, the only person you’re cheating (and hurting!) is yourself.

  • Did you fully commit to staying on the elimination diet?
  • Did you keep up with your food diary and monitor your symptoms? This is particularly important for people who are reacting to foods that are not in the top 8 triggers.
  • Did you refuse cravings to eat off limit foods?

If you answered ‘Yes’ honestly to all of the above, don’t despair. As you are well aware, not everyone with eczema reacts to the same triggers. Perhaps over this diet you found some food sensitivities. Perhaps you didn’t. Perhaps you found some sensitivities and despite avoiding those foods your skin is still worse than ever.

All three scenarios are entirely possible.

Take a deep breath and pat yourself on the back. I know it’s frustrating, but you just completed some major detective work when it comes down to curing your own eczema. Whether you found triggers or not, you are one step closer -even if it doesn’t feel like it.

If your skin is still bad after this whole diet, wipe away those tears and stand up tall. It’s now time to tackle the next eczema monster:

Contact Dermatitis.

An allergist will be able to help immensely with this monster, but in the meantime check out 120 Ingredients Known To Cause Contact Dermatitis and get to throwing out all those irritating soaps, shampoos, and lotions.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/bruin2.jpg” animation=”off” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb”]

In summary, no matter what you choose to do, diet or not. I hope you find health and the end of the road. Just know I’ll be right beside you trying to find the answers too.

Health & Happiness,

Savannah

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Categories
Health

Simple Elimination Diet for Eczema, IBS, and Food Sensitivities

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ admin_label=”section”][et_pb_row custom_padding=”17.9688px|0px|17.9688px|0px”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb]

An elimination diet is a short term diet used to determine foods that trigger inflammation within the body. Inflammation in the body contributes to many health problems such as autoimmune arthritis, acne, irritable bowel syndrome, and eczema -just to name a few!

Our gut houses 70% of our immune system, so the first step to a healthy body is a healthy gut. Worsening symptoms, flare-ups or developing sudden food sensitivities is a loud and clear indicator that something’s not quite right and should be taken seriously. Going on an elimination diet gives your gut a much needed break; giving your body time to heal and providing sweet relief from all the inflammation induced symptoms.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Food Allergies Vs SensitivitIes “]

First thing first, it’s extremely important to note that food allergies and sensitivities are different. Many people are unaware of this, which likely plays a large part in the confusion that arises from the diet-inflammation link.

If a food allergy test comes back negative, people presume that food isn’t connected to their symptoms. In reality, you don’t have to be allergic to react to trigger foods.

Say that again. You don’t have to be allergic to react to trigger foods.

No allergy test in the world will pick up on a food sensitivity, so by far the most effective way to manage symptoms and take health back into your own hands is by completing an elimination diet to figure out your trigger foods. The best part? You can do it all in roughly 30 days!

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/STV_6812.jpg” animation=”off”][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”How to Complete an Elimination diet”]

There are literally thousands of elimination diets that can be found all over the web, each with their own set of rules and guidelines. The more restrictive the diet -the better as you are more likely to discover hidden food sensitivities.

Unfortunately, I like food too much to go on an even more restrictive diet than the basic one outlined below. Instead, we combat an even more restrictive diet by keeping a food diary to monitor any adverse reactions to food not on our ‘no-no’ list.

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”STep 1: Start By Taking Notice”]

Take notice of everything going on within your body, particularily anything that indicates a poor state of health. This includes skin issues like rashes, digestive issues like bloating or constipation, and any moodiness or lethargy.

Write it all down, no matter how minor. This way, 30 days later you can reflect and notice any changes that happened in your health.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/pumpkin-seeds.jpg” animation=”off”][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”17.9688px|0px|0px|0px”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Step 2: Avoid Trigger Foods for 23 Days”]

Once again, this is only a BASIC elimination diet. Here we will eliminate the top triggers, as well as refined sugar and alcohol. These are:

  • Dairy
  • Eggs
  • Tree nuts & Peanuts
  • Soy
  • Shellfish
  • Wheat & Gluten
  • Fast Food & Refined Sugars
  • Alcohol

Scary, I know.

It’s important to note that while these are the top triggers, everyone is different. There are reports of people reacting to anything from nightshades to herbal tea, thus it is important to keep up a food diary even when doing an elimination diet and proceed to remove any foods that you suspect are still triggering reactions.

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Why Avoid Alcohol and Sugar?”]

Your gut contains both good and bad bacteria. Maintaining a good balance between the two is essential for gut health. Alcohol and sugar can promote the growth of bad bacteria and yeast which in turn leads to inflammation, autoimmune disorders, and the very symptoms we wish to avoid.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Why 23 Days?” disabled_on=”off|on|off”]

Why 23 days? Hold on, it’s about to get sciency in here:

Antibodies are protein molecules made by the immune system. They are produced to counteract antigens which are toxins, foreign or harmless substances that induce an immune response. The lifespan of these antibodies is roughly 23 days, hence the 23-day guideline.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/STV_6630.jpg” animation=”off”][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Step 3: Re-introduction”]

Once at least 23 days are over (I go for 30), you can gradually re-introduce the troublesome foods one at a time and see if you react. This process is not to be rushed, (no matter how much you miss bread…I know, I’ve been there too.). This step is done over several days and is vital for accurately determining any food sensitivities.

So how do you do it?

On the 24th day (or the 31st day, if you’re gung-ho) you would introduce one food group.

We’ll start with dairy.

Maybe on the 24th day, we’ll drink a glass of milk and eat some slices of cheese throughout the day. This is not the time to dig into pizza or anything else that has multiple triggers, or that could get confusing! Eat a serving or two of dairy throughout the day (along with your healthy, safe foods -of course) but keep avoiding the other triggers.

Monitor your reactions -if any, for 2 days. During those two days, you’ll go back to avoiding all trigger foods.

If you had no adverse reaction over those two days,  you could safely add dairy back into your diet. Then you would move onto the next food group, repeating the same process, testing one trigger group for one day and gauging the reaction over the next two until you’ve went through all your eliminated food groups.

If you do react, then you’ve likely located a food sensitivity.  Measures should be taken avoid the troublesome food and seek out alternative options for that food group to ensure you continue getting all your essential vitamins and nutrients.

 

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/STV_8024.jpg” animation=”off”][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”0px|0px|0px|0px”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”…What the *Bleep* do I eat?”]

While the list may seem scary, the basic elimination diet still provides a wide variety of foods that can be enjoyed.

You are free to enjoy all types of meat, vegetables, fruits, and gluten-free grains like quinoa and rice. That still leaves a whole lot of dishes to be made! Here’s just a few ideas, let me know in the comments if you’ve got a good one to share!

 Breakfast

Lunch

  • Any kind of salad your heart desires! Try it with grilled chicken and dairy-free dressing.
  • Cowboy Up Salad
  • Grilled Chicken Lettuce Wraps

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”0px|0px|17.9688px|0px”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb]

 

Dinner

Dessert & Sweeteners

Snacks

Remember, if you find yourself reacting to any foods that are not on the elimination list start avoiding them too. This is a diet tailored to you, and you will do best with it once you start giving yourself the attention and love you deserve.

While the elimination diet may be restrictive, you don’t need to count calories, micronutrients or whatever else the fad is nowadays when it comes to dieting. On the elimination diet, you’ll heal your tummy, see a significant improvement in your symptoms, and even drop a few pounds (but that last part is just a bonus!).

No matter what you choose to eat, you will be successful if you follow these three simple principles. Eat real food -mostly plants, avoid all your trigger foods, and (my favorite) always eat when you’re hungry!

Health & Happiness,

Savannah

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”1_2″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Simple.jpg” animation=”off”][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”1_2″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Love-it_-2.jpg” animation=”off”][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Categories
DIY Health

DIY Eczema Safe Bubble Bath Recipe

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ admin_label=”section”][et_pb_row custom_padding=”17.9688px|0px|0px|0px” admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb”]

When it comes to bath time it doesn’t get any better than lighting some candles, turning up some of your favorite tunes, pouring a tall glass, and washing away the day’s stress. Throw some bubbles in the mix and you’ve just created paradise! Of course, as luck and life would have it, long baths are a no go for eczema sufferers.

Great.

I’m much too stubborn to abide by such a (in my humble opinion, ridiculous) rule, despite the truths that may lie behind it. So if you’re anything like me and are starting to miss those long, relaxing bubble baths then you’ll adore this bath recipe free of all those sketchy ingredients that irritate the skin. Plus it’s got some added oil to lock the moisture in for some extra bath (and skin) love!

Of course, this DIY bubble bath for eczema sufferers is not without its drawbacks. These bubbles are nowhere near as big as the store bought (dermatitis causing) bubble baths, but hey – a bubble’s a bubble. If you can enjoy bubbles all while protecting your skin then I figure this makes for a pretty good bubble bath!

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Untitled-design-1.jpg” animation=”off”][/et_pb_image][et_pb_blurb title=”Key Ingredients For Our Bubble Bath” animation=”off”]

Olive Oil: Contains three major antioxidants which are vitamin E, polyphenols, and phytosterols. These antioxidants play a role in preventing premature skin aging and free radical damage.

Coconut Oil: Coconut oil is roughly 50%  lauric acid, a medium chain fatty acid that has shown antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and antibacterial benefits. A study done on young rats also revealed that coconut oil may help heal wounds faster heal by increasing collagen cross-linking. (Click here to see the full study)

Honey: Is naturally antibacterial and full of varying concentrations of polyphenols, (powerful antioxidants) which preventing premature skin aging and free radical damage.

Castille Soap: True castille soap is made strictly with olive oil, however nowadays castille soap is often made with a combination of olive oil and coconut or palm oil. This creates a very mild, gentle soap with a creamy lather, perfect for people with sensitive skin. 

Egg White: Is a mild astringent, in that egg white constricts the skin and shrinks pores. Plus, it also helps create stronger, longer lasting bubbles and that’s all we really want don’t we?

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Untitled-design.jpg” animation=”off” sticky=”on”][/et_pb_image][et_pb_blurb]

Makes: 2 Baths     Time: 5 minutes

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”Ingredients” admin_label=”Blurb”]

  • 1/4 cup of olive oil or coconut oil
  • 1/8 cup of raw honey
  • 1/2 cup of liquid castille soap
  • 3 teaspoons of vanilla extract
  • 5 drops of your favorite essential oil. Vanilla, rose, geranium -or whatever you like!
  • 1 egg white
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable glycerin

*Vegetable glycerin can be difficult to find and tends to be found in the beauty/pharmacy aisle of most department stores (or there’s always good ol‘ Amazon). While you don’t need vegetable glycerin for this recipe, the bubbles are bigger and stick around longer with it!  

 

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Directions”]

Combine everything in a small bowl and whisk until the honey is thoroughly mixed in. Add to your bath water as it’s running.

This makes enough for 2 baths and is perishable, so pour in half and store the rest in a sealed (preferably labeled) container in the fridge and use within a week. Personally, I think there’s no such thing as too many bubbles, so if you’re anything like me dump the entire mixture into the running bath and enjoy in all your bubbly glory!

Then go on -sink bubbles deep and pamper yourself! You’ve earned it!

Don’t forget to finish up with a thick cream or your DIY Eczema Body Butter to lock moisture in and ensure your skin remains soft for hours.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/STV_6789.jpg” animation=”off”][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb]

There we have it, a bubble bath that’s safe for us with sensitive, itchy skin! Need some extra bath lovin’? Check out these 3 Itch Busting Bath Recipes.

Health & Happiness,

Savannah

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”1_2″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/DIY-2.jpg” animation=”off”][/et_pb_image][et_pb_image animation=”off” sticky=”on”][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”1_2″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Love-it_-2.jpg” animation=”off”][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Categories
Health

120 Cosmetic Ingredients Known To Cause Contact Dermatitis

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ admin_label=”section”][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb”]

Here is a cut and dry list of over 100 ingredients known to cause contact dermatitis. This list is in alphabetical order only – rather than severity as not everyone reacts or is sensitive to these chemicals. What may irritate me, may do nothing to you and vise versa.

Of course, it’s important to note that…I’m only human and not even a specialized human like doctors or nurses. I’m just a small town girl with a passion to get rid of eczema once and for all, so I urge you to read my disclaimer before we get started. 

I’ll warn you now, this is a daunting list. It’s best to print it off and carry it with you to refer to later. While I can’t talk about the effects of EVERY ingredient on this list (cause let’s face it, that would take forever), here’s just a few things our villains are capable of.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”17.9688px|0px|17px|0px” admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Lipstick-1.jpg” animation=”off” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Meet the Villains” admin_label=”Blurb”]

Parfum/Fragrance: One of the top villains, fragrances are not only one of the major allergens but they are also wickedly deceptive. There are over 3000 chemicals used in fragrances, with most being protected by the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act as they are considered ‘trade secrets’. This means the chemicals within that fragrance don’t have to be listed on the label. Talk about sketchy.

On top of that, products labeled ‘unscented’ and ‘hypoallergenic’ DO in fact contain masking fragrances. Only products labeled ‘fragrance-free’ truly have no fragrances.

Sulfates: Are both foaming agents and cleansers found in thousands of products from toothpastes to body washes. Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS) is one of the harshest sulfates, it’s so good at cleaning that it is commonly found in engine degreasers and industrial cleaning products! As people grew more wary of this, manufactures began a new marketing scheme ‘SLS Free’ and began using SLS under names like Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate, Sulfuric Acid, Monododecyl Ester, and Sodium Salt (Talk about ca-ching $$$. Wicked.)

Cocamidopropyl Betaine: Deemed ‘Allergen of the Year’ according to The American Contact Dermatitis Society back in 2004, it is a cleansing and lathering ingredient. Approximately 3-7% of the population show sensitivity to this villain, and perhaps even more shocking? It’s often in products labelled as ‘hypoallergenic’.

A close pal to Cocamidopropyl Betaine is Cocamide DEA. Both are derived from coconuts, and while that seems harmless it is another severe source of contact allergens. Back in June 2012, California listed Cocamide DEA as a known chemical to cause cancer. At this time, DEA compounds are unrestricted in Canada. Now that’s scary.

Phthalates: Commonly listed as DBP or di-n-butyl phthalate, phthalates are considered a potential carcinogen with the possibility to contribute to birth defects, allergic reactions and eczema.

Formaldehyde: A chemical that is also used in mixtures to EMBALM DEAD BODIES, you could say we’ve really found the wicked witch of the west with this one. Formaldehyde is a known carcinogenic that the European Union has deemed ‘may not be safe’ for use. Outrageously, it is still found in soaps and baby shampoos! What’s even more wicked? You won’t see it listed under the name Formaldehyde, rather it will be listed under the name of preservatives that release formaldehyde such as Qauternium-15, Dimethyl-Dimethyl (DMDM) Hydantion, Imidazolidiyl Urea,  Diazolidinyl Urea, Sodium Hydroxmethylglycinate and 2-Bromo-2-Nitropropane-1,3 Diol (bronopol). Cue the ominous music.

Parabens: Last but not least we have parabens, which are anti-bacterial agents added to products to prevent the growth of mold. While parabens are not strictly contact allergens, they have been found to disrupt hormones and are also found in cancerous tissues. Scary.

Did I scare you enough? Now onto the list:

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb”]

  • 2-Bromo-2-Nitropropane-1,3-Diol (bronopol)
  • 3-Cyclohexane Carboaldehyde
  • Alcohol Denat
  • Alpha Amyl Cinnamic Alcohol
  • Amidoamine
  • Ammonium Laureth Sulfate
  • Ammonium Lauryl Sulfate
  • Amodimethicone
  • Amyl Cinnamal
  • Anisyl Alcohol
  • Anthemis Nobilis (Chamomile)
  • Balsam of Peru (Myroxylon Pereirae)
  • Benzyl Alcohol
  • Benzyl Benzoate
  • Benzyl Cinnamate
  • Benzyl Salicylate
  • Butylated Hydroxytolune (BHT)
  • Butylphenyl Methylpropional
  • Cassia Oil
  • Cetearyl Methicone
  • Cetyl Dimethicone
  • Chlorphenesin
  • Cinnamal
  • Cinnamic Alcohol
  • Cinnamic Aldehyde
  • Cinnamon
  • Cinnamyl Alcohol
  • Citral
  • Citronella
  • Citronellol
  • Cloves
  • Cocamide DEA
  • Cocamidopropyl Betaine
  • Coumarin
  • Cyclopentasiloxane
  • Cyclomethicone
  • Diazolidinyl Urea
  • Diethanolamine (DEA)
  • Dimethicone
  • Dimethicone Copolyol
  • Dimethiconol
  • Dimethyl-Dimethyl (DMDM) Hydantoin
  • Di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP)
  • DMDM Hydantoin
  • Ethanol
  • Ethyl Alcohol
  • Ethylene Bassylate
  • Ethylene Glycol
  • Ethylparaben
  • Eugenol
  • Evernia Furfuracea
  • Evernia Prunastri
  • Farnesol
  • Formaldehyde
  • Fragrance Mix 1
  • Geraniol
  • Glyceryl thioglycolate
  • Hexylcinnamal
  • Hydroxycitronellal
  • Hydroxyisohexyl
  • Imidazolidinyl Urea (Imidurea)
  • Iodopropynyl Butylcarbamate
  • Isobutylparaben
  • Isoeugenol
  • Isomethyl Ionone
  • Isopropyl Alcohol
  • Isopropyl Palminate
  • Kathon CG
  • Lanolin
  • Lanolin Alcohol
  • Lauramide DEA
  • Limonene
  • Linalool (Lavender)
  • Lyral
  • Methicone
  • Methyl-2-Octynoate
  • Methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone
  • Methyldibromoglutaronitrile/ phenoxyethanol
  • Methylisothiazolinone
  • Methyl methacrylate
  • Methylparaben
  • Mineral Oil (Paraffinum Liquidum)
  • Monododecyl Ester
  • Monoethanolamine (MEA)
  • Oak Moss Absolute
  • Parabens
  • Paraphenylene Diamine (PPD)
  • Parfum
  • Petrolatum Liquidum
  • Phenoxyethanol
  • Phenyl Trimethicone
  • Phthalates
  • Polyethylene Glycol
  • Potassium Sorbate
  • p-Phenylenediamine
  • Propanol
  • Propyl Alcohol
  • Propylene Glycol
  • Propylparaben
  • Quaternium-15
  • Retinoids
  • SD Alcohol 40
  • SD Alcohol
  • Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate
  • Sodium Hydroxide
  • Sodium Hydroxymethylglycinate
  • Sodium Laureth Sulfate
  • Sodium Lauryl Ether Sulphate
  • Sodium Myreth Sulfate
  • Sodium Salt
  • Stearyl Dimethicone
  • Sulfuric Acid
  • Tetrasodium EDTA
  • Tocopherl Acetate
  • Tosylamide Formaldehyde Resin
  • Triclosan
  • Triethanolamine (TEA)
  • Triethanolamine Lauryl Sulfate (often labeled as TEA Lauryl Sulfate)
  • Trimethylsilylamodimethicone
  • Yarrow (Achillea Millefolium)

 

NOTE: Both Yarrow and Linalool (a compound naturally found in over 200 plants, including lovely lavender) are on the bad list, despite both lavender and yarrow being healing plants. Unfortunately, I did have to include them as there were several reports of irritation with these two lovely herbs. This is likely due to the individual’s sensitivity to the herb itself, rather than how it was processed in cosmetics. In summary, please  don’t shy away from yarrow and lavender if you have no known sensitivities to them as ultimately they can be very beneficial.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Lipstick.jpg” animation=”off” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb”]

This is a daunting list, I know. Print it off, and carry this list with you -you’ll be okay. As I said above, not everyone will react to these ingredients. Unfortunately for us with contact dermatitis, identifying which ingredient is irritating us within the mess of all the other chemicals in our soaps, shampoos, and cosmetics can be near impossible.

At this time, I don’t know of any store bought products free of all these chemicals but if you do, don’t be afraid to leave a comment and let us all know! My mother and I had a look through her favorite salon quality shampoos ingredients and there was A TON of the above listed on it. Yikes.

Eventually I’d love to start building my own soaps and shampoos, but in the meantime here is a DIY Eczema Cream for all your lotion needs (free of all that junk above).

Health & Happiness,

Savannah

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”1_2″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Contact-Dermatitis.jpg” animation=”off”][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”1_2″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Love-it_-2.jpg” animation=”off”][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Categories
Health

10 Facts About Eczema

[et_pb_section bb_built=”1″ admin_label=”section”][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb”]

Here are 10 facts you may not know about eczema that you can use to impress your friends! …Or more likely will be used when you have already said every cuss in the book and you need something else to mutter to yourself while dealing with that annoying rash that itches.

Enjoy!

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb” title=”1. %22Ekzein%22″] Eczema comes from the Greek word “ekzein” meaning “to boil over”. [/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb” title=”2. Worldwide Disease”]

It is estimated that eczema affects roughly 20% of children and 1-3% of adults worldwide.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb” title=”3. Eczema Is on the rise”] Since 1970, the prevalence of eczema has almost tripled. From 2000 – 2010 alone, the prevalence of eczema in children (younger than eighteen) living in the United States rose roughly 5%. See a break down here. [/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb” title=”4. Eczema is not contagious”]

Contrary to overwhelming fear and misconception, if someone touches you with eczema you will not acquire this itchy, red, rash too. Of course in turn, if you have eczema you won’t pass it on to anyone else. This isn’t the plague, guys.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb” title=”5. It’s Genetic”] Eczema is seen in families with a history of asthma and hay fever. Asthma, hay fever and eczema are all atopic diseases (the three of them are known as the Atopic Triad). Atopy refers to an inherited tendency to produces an antibody (known as immuglobulin E) in response to common enviromental protiens such as dust mites, pollen, and food allergens. It is estimated that half of all children with eczema will develop asthma or hay fever as well.  [/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][et_pb_image admin_label=”Image” src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/baby.jpg” animation=”off” sticky=”on”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb” title=”6. A Children’s Disease”] Eczema is most prevalent in children, with 1 in 5 children being affected. Over half of all sufferers display symptoms before their first birthday, with roughly 74% of children ‘growing out of’ the disease by their sixteenth birthday. [/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb” title=”7. There are Several Kinds”]

There are several different types of eczema:

  • Atopic dermatitis: The most common kind of eczema, frequently associated with allergic disorders. Characterized by chronic red, itchy inflammation of the skin.
  • Contact dermatitis: Red itchy rash, a reaction caused by a substance that comes in contact with the skin.
  • Dyshidrotic or Pompholyx eczema: A condition where very small, (sometimes deep-seated) fluid-filled blisters form on the palm of the hands, in between fingers, or on the soles of the feet.
  • Neurodermatitis: Starting as a patch of itchy skin, itching causes skin to become thick and leathery due to chronic itching.
  • Nummular dermatitis: A chronic condition where coin shaped spots develop on the skin. Itchy and well defined, these spots may ooze and weep.
  • Stasis dermatitis: An inflammatory disease occuring in the lower extremeties, where blood pools in either one or both legs. Pressure makes fluid leak out of the veins, into the skin.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb” title=”8. There Is No Medical Cure”] While steroid creams and treatments help manage eczema and control symptoms, at this point in time there is no medical cure. [/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb” title=”9. Immunodeficiency Indicator”]

While not everyone who has eczema has an autoimmune disease, skin disease such as eczema and psoriasis are often one of the earliest symptoms to primary immunodeficiency diseases. Primary immunodeficiency diseases are a group of chronic disorders where the body’s immune system does not function properly.

NOTE: Once again, eczema can be found in people with normal immune systems too!

See an entire breakdown here.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Image” src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/pastasalad1.jpg” animation=”off”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb” title=”10. Some Food can make eczema worse”]

There are many triggers when it comes to eczema, with food being a large one. While the diet and eczema link is often overlooked, food sensitivities can play a large role in flare ups and worsening symptoms. NOTE: Food allergies and sensitivites are different. This may play a large part in the misconception about the diet/eczema link. If food allergy tests come back negative, people presume the food isn’t connected to the itchy rash. In reality, you don’t have to be allergic to react to trigger foods.

Top triggers for eczema include:

  •  Dairy
  • Gluten & Wheat
  • Eggs
  • Soy
  • Peanuts & Tree nuts
  • Shellfish

While those are the top triggers, everyone is different. What may affect me, will do nothing to you and vice versa. This is why it’s essential to keep a food diary to figure out your triggers as there have been reports of people reacting to anything from night shades to herbal tea!

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb”]

There we have it! 10 eczema facts that, lets face it – probably won’t impress your friends…but hey! At least you know more about eczema, right?

Health & Happiness,

Savannah

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”1_2″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Image” src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/10-3.jpg” animation=”off”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”1_2″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Image” src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Love-it_-2.jpg” animation=”off”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Categories
DIY Health

DIY Eczema Body Butter

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ custom_padding=”0px|0px|35.9375px|0px” admin_label=”section”][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb”]

Besides cooking and baths (especially bubble baths!), I love making DIY beauty treatments for myself to enjoy after a long hard day. Not only do they save a pretty penny (which is always a plus) but it gives you an excuse to take time out of your day to take care of yourself. Health is about feeling good inside and out! (Hello bath recipes, I’m looking at you).

I’ve been on the search for a homemade eczema cream with essential oils for a long time now. Those store bought body and hand lotions do nothing for me but sting, burn, and irritate my eczema. After the stinging subsides, my eczema turns redder than ever and the lotion’s soft skin benefits stick around for maybe half an hour? YES, even ones geared towards eczema sufferers.

Ridiculous, I know.

After expressing my frustration, my lovely grandmother gave me this body butter recipe to try (I’m pretty sure she actually got it from Dr.Axe so click here to see the original!). This recipe is easy to make, sting free, ultra LONG LASTING (I’m talking 12 hours+), and you go throughout your day smelling like flowers.

Dreams do come true!

(For those who don’t want to smell like flowers, scroll down to the tips and tricks segment of this article. You can thank me later!)

So if you’re ready for some wholesome goodness pampering let’s get right into it!

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”0px|0px|17.9688px|0px” admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/whippedbodybutter.jpg” animation=”off” sticky=”on” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text”]

 INGREDIENTS

  • 1/2 cup pure shea butter
  • 1/2 cup virgin coconut oil
  • 30 drops of lavendar essential oil*
  • 8 drops of tea tree essential oil
  • 5 drops of rose or geranium essential oil (I used geranium)*
  • Airtight container

DIRECTIONS

Grab a pot and a glass bowl. Fill the pot with roughly an inch or two of water and place the glass bowl in the mouth of the pot. Make sure the glass bowl in wide enough that it doesn’t touch the water but rather sits a few inches above the water, being supported by the rim of the pot.

Heat the water over medium heat, and place the shea butter and the coconut oil in the glass bowl. Stir frequently until completely melted.

Once everything is well blended, add the essential oils and mix well.

Remove from heat, and let cool so that the mixture begins to thicken. Speed this process up by placing the mixture in the refrigerator for roughly half an hour. NOTE: You don’t want mixture to be completely solid, or it will be difficult to mix.

Once the edges of the mixture start to thicken, remove from fridge. Using a handheld or stand up mixer, beat the body butter for several minutes until it begins to get the consistency of lotion -five to ten minutes. (My kitchen was mega hot from all the other goodies I had cooking, so if your kitchen was like mine and your body butter refused to thicken, beat the mixture thoroughly for several minutes and place back in the fridge until solid)

Transfer to an air tight container and store at room temperature.

 

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/bodybutter3.jpg” animation=”off” sticky=”on” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”DIY eczema Butter Tips & Tricks” admin_label=”Blurb”]

  1. As I said above, this lotion is ultra long-lasting. In order for it to be so long-lasting, it is on the oily side. Don’t despair as it dries completely in roughly half an hour, leaving you with amazingly soft skin for hours to come and creates a definite lasting barrier between your skin and the outside world
  2. If you don’t want to feel greasy before school or work, apply before bed and climb into your favorite jammies. YES, you will wake up with super soft skin (minus the grease), YES you’ll still feel the body butter’s barrier protecting your skin from the outside world (and locking moisture in), and YES you’ll wake up smelling like flowers. Jackpot!
  3. *Lavender, Rose or Geranium Essential Oil:  If you don’t want to smell like flowers, try replacing lavender essential oil with cedarwood essential oil and replacing the rose or geranium essential oil with juniper, frankincense, or birch essential oil. You’ll smell like the great outdoors -Win! 

Eager for more?

 Check out MomPrepares’s in-depth article on treating eczema with essential oils. You’ll find recipes for treating eczema in adults and children as well as valuable information on oils for allergies, dust mites, bacterial infections and so much more!

4. Last but certainly not least: Remember to use the body butter sparingly -a little goes a long way! 

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/bodybutter4.jpg” animation=”off” sticky=”on”][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb”]

There we have it!

A homemade eczema cream with essential oils. Soak it up and enjoy!

Health & Happiness,

Savannah

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”1_2″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/DIY-Body-Butter.jpg” animation=”off”][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”1_2″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Love-it_-2.jpg” animation=”off”][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Categories
DIY Health

3 Itch Busting Eczema Bath Recipes

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ admin_label=”section”][et_pb_row custom_padding=”17.9688px|0px|0px|0px” admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb”]

There is nothing I love more than sinking into a nice warm bath after a long, hard day. Something about the heat and the water seems to just melt all your stresses away (and the wine, the wine helps too).

Since developing eczema I’ve been told that if I want to enjoy my precious baths, that the recommended bath time is 5-10 minutes. However, through sheer determination and perhaps a shred of pigheadedness I’ve seen to it that a warm bath is never wasted.

So if you’re a bath lover like me, here are three bath recipes for you to enjoy that will soothe the itch – guilt and timer free!

 

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/oatmeal.jpg” animation=”off” sticky=”on” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”The Tried and True Oatmeal Bath” admin_label=”Blurb”]

Oatmeal for skin care use has been documented as far back to 2000BC and still continues to this day. With anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, an oatmeal bath is perfect for people with sensitive skin or skin disorders.

  • 3/4 cup of raw, unflavored oats
  • grinder (optional)
  • muslin bag or a pair of pantyhose (optional)

Follow along, it’s simple!

You’ve got two options for making this milky, soothing bath.

1. Grind the oats up into a fine powder, this will ensure the oats will dissolve completely rather than sinking to the bottom. Test that the oats are fine enough by taking a tablespoon and stirring it into a bowl of warm water. If the oatmeal dissolves without much effort and the water turns a milky color – you’re good to go!

2. Put whole oats into a muslin bag or a pair of unwanted pantyhose. Essentially, this will act much like a tea bag – infusing the water with its wholesome goodness. Squeeze the bag often for faster infusion. Muslin bags are much cleaner method than the ground oats, as all the oats stay contained.

Pour the ground oats or place the bag in the bath while it’s filling at a comfortable temperature. Then sit back, relax, and let those worries and itches melt away!

 

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/saltshells.jpg” animation=”off” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”17.9688px|0px|0px|0px” admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Devoted to the ocean Salt Bath” admin_label=”Blurb”][/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb”]

Salt baths are known for their wide variety of benefits.

From pain relief to antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties, its no wonder that salt baths have been praised for ages. Try 1/2 a cup for a simple relaxing bath or up the salt concentration to promote healing of eczema and other ailments.

or

  • 1 – 2 cups of Epsom salts

Pour in the salt while the bath is running, light that candle, grab a glass of wine and let the minerals do their thing!

Sea Salt vs. Epsom Salt vs Table Salt

The options are relatively endless when it comes to what kind of salt to bathe in. Natural, unprocessed sea salts are the most renowned, as they contain trace minerals such as magnesium, calcium chloride, potassium, and bromides; all of which are absorbed through the skin during your bath. Magnesium binds water to the skin, promoting skin cell growth and permeability. Calcium increases circulation and strengthens bones and nails. Potassium balances skin moisture and is a vital mineral to replace after intense exercise, and bromides ease and relax stiff muscles.

Not sure which to try?

  • Dead Sea Salt – perhaps the most famous bathing salt. A white salt only found in a saline lake located 400 meters below sea level; claims to be richer in minerals than other sea salts.
  • Sel Gris Sea Salt – an unprocessed grey sea salt hand harvested off the coast of France.
  • Alaea Sea Salt – an unprocessed Hawaiian reddish-brown salt enriched with volcanic clay.
  • Himalayan Pink Sea Salt – ancient sea salt found in the mountains of northern Pakistan, this pink salt made its mark on the world while boasting 84 trace minerals.

Epsom salts claim the same health benefits of natural sea salt and can be a handy alternative if you do not have easy access to large amounts of sea salt. Epsom salt is high in magnesium and sulfates, with magnesium aiding in skin cell growth and sulfates being essential for the production of collagen (which maintains healthy skin, hair, and nails) and plays an important role for forming proteins in the joints.

  • Try plain epsom salts, rather than the ones laced with fragrances which could further irritate your skin.

Table salt should be avoided as it is heavily processed. Minerals are removed until it is pure sodium chloride and then an additive is added to prevent clumping. The benefits to bathing in table salt are slim, as opposed to sea salt and epsom salt -so do your skin a favor and go for the good stuff.

A word of warning: Avoid when pregnant. Avoid sea salt baths and if you have hypertension or respiratory conditions. Open wounds may cause stinging and minor discomfort.  Salt baths can be demanding on your circulatory system, consult your doctor if you suffer from weak or poor heart circulation.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/islandvibes.jpg” animation=”off” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Island Vibes Coconut Bath” admin_label=”Blurb”]

With honey’s antibacterial properties as well as coconut’s punch with vitamins C and E; honey and coconut form the power duo your skin will be thankful for!

Vitamin C plays a vital role in collagen synthesis (the protein needed for healthy skin, nails, and hair) as well as potentially helping treat and prevent ultraviolet (UV) damage. Vitamin E is an excellent antioxidant that cannot be produced by the body. These powerful antioxidants help neutralize free radicals and prevent cellular damage.

  • 1 1/2 cups of coconut milk*
  • 2 tablespoons of honey
  • 2 tablespoons of coconut oil

Mix the honey, coconut oil and coconut milk together in a bowl. Placing the mixture in the microwave for 10 seconds will help soften the honey and allow it to mix and dissolve easier.

Pour the mixture into a running bath, then grab your pina colada smoothie (or perhaps something a bit…harder), sink on down and enjoy!

*Milk may be used as a substitute for coconut milk

 

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/salt1.jpg” animation=”off” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”For Some extra bath love try:” admin_label=”Blurb”]

  • 2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil or coconut oil
  • 5-10 drops of essential oils such as lavender, chamomile, rose, or sandalwood*
  • 4-5 tablespoons of baking soda*

*Essential oils may cause skin irritation, especially if you are sensitive to salicylates.  Pregnant women as well as those with diabetes or high blood pressure should consult a doctor before adding essential oils or baking soda to bath water.

So there we have it: three itch busting baths guaranteed to satisfy any bath lover! Be sure to end every bath with a good moisturizer like this DIY Eczema Body Butter and then climb into your favorite fuzzy pajamas – you’ve earned it.

Health & Happiness

Savannah

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”1_2″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/3-Itch-Busting-Eczema-Bath-Recipes.jpg” animation=”off”][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”1_2″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Love-it_-2.jpg” animation=”off”][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Categories
Health

What is Eczema?

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ admin_label=”section”][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb”]

Before we get started I just want to let you know that I am not a medical doctor, nurse, and so on. I have based my writings on my own experiences, opinions, and extensive research. Therefore, read my disclaimer and use the information within my blog appropriately and at your own risk.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”17.9688px|0px|0px|0px” admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”What is eczema?” admin_label=”Blurb”]

Eczema is referred to as atopic dermatitis. Atopic refers to a  group of diseases with a tendency to develop other allergic conditions, like asthma or hay fever. Dermatitis means inflammation of the skin. Atopic dermatitis is not contagious, but rather is typically inherited and found in families with a history of asthma and allergies.

Eczema is an inflammatory disease which causes the skin to become inflamed or irritated, and is commonly described as the “rash that itches”. While some reactions can be triggered by touching an irritant, (this is known as contact dermatitis which is slightly different from atopic dermatitis), most reactions are triggered from within. Read that again. Say it with me. Most reactions are triggered from within.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Your Skin And Eczema” admin_label=”Blurb”]

When you have eczema, the skin barrier does not function normally. It becomes too thin, resulting in wet looking, “weepy skin”. Skin becomes abnormally dry and sensitive as your natural moisturizing oils are carried away. Defects in the skin barrier can allow allergens such as pollen, mold, dust mites and bacteria to enter the body. This contributes to flare-ups and immune responses, such as allergic reactions.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/hand.jpg” animation=”off” sticky=”on” disabled_on=”off|off|off” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][et_pb_blurb title=”Symptoms of Eczema” admin_label=”Blurb”]

Beginning characteristics of eczema include itchy skin, redness (inflammation), and often tiny fluid-filled blisters (vesicles) that can weep and ooze.  If untreated crusted, thickened plaques of skin begin to form over the affected area. To an eczema sufferer’s despair, that thickened skin forms only to break open itch, ooze and become inflamed once again.

So begins the endless cycle of itch, ooze, crust.

While eczema can show up anywhere, it most commonly appears on the face, back of the knees, wrists, hands, or feet.

Above: I apologize for not having graphic pictures of my severe eczema, I tried to avoid it. As of now, my hands are on the mend and nearly back to normal. Note the cracks below my index finger -cracks like this used to extend to the middle of my palm. For a graphic mental picture the palm of my hand started as inflamed red itchy skin, thickened skin began to form, painful cracks resulted from moving my hands. Itch, ooze, crust.

Note also: The rough looking skin along my fingers, most predominantly on my pinky and middle finger. This was also where inflamed, itchy skin lived.

Itch, ooze, crust. Rinse and Repeat.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/james.jpg” animation=”off” sticky=”on” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Baby Eczema” admin_label=”Blurb”]

Although eczema can occur at any age, it is most commonly found in babies, with more than half of all eczema sufferers showing symptoms before their first birthday. Eczema is seen as a disease that children will “grow out of” with roughly 74% of affected children becoming eczema free by sixteen years old. There is no guarantee that children will outgrow their eczema, and unfortunately, if it continues then it is said the symptoms will continue on and off throughout life.

Approximately 3% percent of adults will have moderate to severe eczema in their lifetime.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Causes of Eczema” admin_label=”Blurb”]

The exact cause of eczema is unknown, but it is suggested to be linked to an overactive response by the body’s immune system to an irritant. Irritants can vary from each individual, from food allergies to harsh chemicals (whether it be in cleaning products or soaps and shampoos). The reaction to harsh chemicals is likely contact dermatitis, with the reaction (more often than not) stopping once contact with the chemical is avoided. However harsh chemicals are no help for atopic dermatitis sufferers, and can further aggravate existing eczema by soaking into cuts and weakened layers of the skin so thus should be avoided as well.

Leaky gut syndrome may also be a factor, which is a condition where the digestive tract is damaged. This creates holes in the gut lining allowing undigested food particles, bad bacteria, or other toxins to seep into your bloodstream causing an immune reaction.

In summary, your immune system reacts as if it’s under attack and attempts to defend itself by releasing antibodies and inflammation.

While there are many, the most common triggers for this include:

  • Dairy
  • Wheat (and other gluten-containing grains)
  • Eggs
  • Nuts
  • Shellfish
  • Soy
  • Sulfites
  • Salicylates

A Note About Stress Stress is commonly considered a factor or trigger when it comes to eczema. However, it is unlikely the stress itself causing the reaction, but rather the result of your already overactive immune system being weakened with high levels of stress. Although it is impossible to remove stress completely from your life, measures should be taken to lower stress levels in order to help your immune system remain healthy and strong.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/lemon.jpg” animation=”off” sticky=”on” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Is Eczema Curable?” url_new_window=”on” admin_label=”Blurb”]

In the medical world today, the most common ‘cure’ for eczema include topical creams ranging from over the counter products containing hydrocortisone to prescription creams and ointments containing corticosteroids.

Hydrocortisone is a mild steroid. Corticosteroids are a class of steroid hormones ranging from 2% all the way to 600% more potent than hydrocortisone, depending on the type of cream prescribed. The stronger the potency, the better effect it has on inflammation and the greater risk of side effects with continued use.

The bottom line when it comes to the topical creams is that they never treat the root cause – only the symptoms. Each steroid ‘treats’ your eczema by preventing the production of chemicals that cause inflammation, as well as suppressing the immune system by affecting how the white blood cells work. While your skin may look better for the time being, steroids are not to be used long term.

Thus when removed from steroids, the affected skin tends to “flare up” and appear worse than ever as the body’s natural response is no longer suppressed. As the vicious cycle goes, eczema suffers can be stuck with steroid usage for years. Always moving to stronger and stronger steroids when the body naturally flares up once the duration of the prescribed steroid inevitably ends.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Healing from The Inside Out”]

It is important to remember that eczema is an inflammatory disease, with most reactions coming from within. Your immune system is attacking a (usually harmless) substance which can indicate a food intolerance or allergy. The most effective way to cure your eczema is to start an elimination diet. This is a short-term diet that eliminates certain foods which may be causing allergic reactions or digestive issues and then gradually introducing the foods one at a time to discover what your body does -and doesn’t tolerate.

There are millions of elimination diets all over the web, however, the one I stand by and have been following is a book called ‘The Eczema Diet’ by Karen Fisher. She is a wealth of information, and I’m sure you will find her knowledge the greatest asset for getting rid of eczema once and for all.

No matter which route you choose, may you find health and happiness at the end of the road.

Health & Happiness,

Savannah

 

 

 

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”1_2″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/What-is-1.jpg” animation=”off” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”1_2″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Love-it_-2.jpg” animation=”off” admin_label=”Image”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Categories
Health

How To Eat At Friends And Loved Ones Homes With Dietary Restrictions

[et_pb_section bb_built=”1″ admin_label=”section”][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb”]

It’s amazing how a gathering that’s supposed to bring so much joy and laughter can become such a challenging and awkward situation. Being lactose intolerant (and with dairy being my number one eczema trigger), I swear my hands start itching when I watch milk being added to a dish.

I hold my breath while I listen to the host’s ingredient list being rambled off praying for a dish I can eat itch and worry-free…

“…potatoes…onions…cheese”

Dammit.

Been there? Me too. It’s awkward being the one people have to accommodate for, but here’s how to survive it.

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb” title=”Remind your host”]

Don’t be afraid to gently remind your host about your dietary restrictions.

Try to do so the moment they invite you so that they have adequate time to prepare. It doesn’t matter how many times you’ve already told them, or that you think that they should remember ‘by now’. People are far too busy with their own lives to worry about you and your diet.

Did the dish still wind up being something you can’t stomach?

Don’t take it personally, just because they didn’t remember doesn’t mean they don’t care. Keep in mind that not everyone has a pantry full of substitutes for dairy, gluten, or whatever else it may be.

 

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Image” src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/spaghettisquash.jpg” animation=”off” sticky=”on”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb” title=”Bring your own dish”]

 Help out your host (and you!)  by offering to bring a dish, and be sure to make enough to share. You’ll be guaranteed to eat without worry, and who knows -maybe it’ll leave your loved ones begging for more!

Not sure what to make? Here’s a bit of inspiration:

 

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Image” src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/dexter.jpg” animation=”off” sticky=”on”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb” title=”Channel your inner 3 year old”]

 Now I don’t mean kicking, screaming, crying, and otherwise just having a major tantrum on the floor… I mean I suppose you could, you certainly wouldn’t have to worry about being invited back over anytime soon…(so maybe?).

What I actually mean is take small portions of the dish your host generously provided and pick through your food (and around your all your ‘no-no’ foods).

We’ve all seen kids pickily go through their food, have we not?

While this means you may not be the one at the table with the most manners, sometimes you just gotta do what you gotta do. Keep in mind that just because you are channeling your inner 3-year old it doesn’t mean you have to also make a fuss and draw attention to yourself by disgustedly pushing food to the side.

(Unless  of course, you don’t want to be invited back… so again… maybe?)

Fill up the rest of your plate with veggies, salad or anything else that’s sure to make your tummy happy.

Smile wide and say your (as my 3-year-old cousin would say) “pwease and tank yous”

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row” custom_padding=”17.9688px|0px|0px|0px”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb” title=”Graciously Decline”]

 So there is literally absolutely NOTHING tummy and itch safe on the table?

The host’s main dish has milk laced throughout, EVERY SINGLE bun in the entire house is already buttered, dessert is 14 scoops of ice cream, and by God there’s even cheese melted over the salad!

Melted cheese on a salad? Are they trying to kill me!?

So what now -as the guilt starts building up inside of you– is there to do?

Pull up your big kid panties and walk over to the host. Graciously apologize and explain that, as much as you would love to dig into their delicious cheese salad… that you just can’t do it. Chances are right then and there, your lovely host will at the start pulling out anything they think could work for you.

Try not to let the guilt eat you up, it’s alright.

From there, go on and get your hands dirty. Your host has done more than enough for you, so insist on putting together your own plate of goodies from the tummy safe food they provided.

Be sure to whole heartily thank them.

 

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Image” src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/energybite1.jpg” animation=”off” sticky=”on”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_blurb admin_label=”Blurb” title=”Pack a Snack”]

This is a habit I’ve picked up recently, but not exclusively for going over to people’s houses.

The whole habit started once I chose to cut out dairy. While my loved ones could just pull into any fast food joint or sit down at any restaurant, I had to be a little more careful about what was in my food (does everything have cheese on it nowadays? Good gracious!).

Let’s just say I learned the hard way that I can get real hangry real quick if I go without food. So in order to save myself and my loved ones,  I constantly have a stash of safe snacks in my purse, in my car, and at least one in my jacket.

Now when that salad quit sticking to your bones, and everyone around you is scooping up bowls of ice cream (R.I.P. my favorite and forbidden dessert), you can go to your jacket and pull out a treat for yourself.

I’d love to have a wide variety of suggestions for you, but I don’t. The only snack I carry with me is my No Bake. No Fuss. Energy Bites. They’re naturally sweetened with honey and are usually just enough to get rid of a dessert craving (even when you still long for ice cream).

So there we have it, five eating out survival tactics. Let me know if you’ve got another tactic, and let me in on your favorite emergency snacks!

Health and Happiness,

Savannah

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”1_2″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Image” src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/How-To-Eat-AtFriends-Loved-Ones-Homes-With.jpg” animation=”off” align=”center”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”1_2″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Image” src=”http://thehumblekitchen.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Love-it_-2.jpg” animation=”off”] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]